Saturday, May 22, 2010

in 1837, Charles Dickens wrote

in Oliver Twist:

There are some promotions in life which, independent of the more substantial rewards they offer, acquire peculiar value and dignity from the coats and waistcoats connected with them. A field-marshal has his uniform, a bishop his silk apron, a counsellor his silk gown, a beadle his cocked hat. Strip the bishop of his apron, or the beadle of his hat and lace - what are they? Men. Mere men. Dignity, and even holiness too, sometimes, are more questions of coat and waistcoat than some people imagine.

Been reading Dickens every day. Unlike most recent popular fiction, his words are meant to be savored at a speaking pace, as if you were reading them aloud. Very satisfying, like a juicy medium-rare prime rib with horseradish sauce.

6 comments:

Nelly said...

In the last year I have listened to many Dickens'novels in audiobook form. I've savoured each and every one.

Father Tony said...

I should have guessed as much. It's sifted into you merry prose.

ewe said...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BjGpcEA-FyE

baad lamb said...

I know you love Oliver Twisted, but, Mr. Coleman, you must take up Tale of Two Cities next.
-Charles Darnay

Tater said...

I suggest avoiding Bleak House for a time, It was the most recent Dickens I have read, and it lives up to its name.

Choirboy Vallejo said...

Perhaps it's that I was a slow reader as a child, or the fact that I have the Actor/Queer gene, but I still read ever word aloud in my head. Seems like such a waste to rush through what an author has taken all that time to put on paper